barley tea, linda villano, mugicha, japanese tea
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MUGI-WHA??? - Guest Post by Linda Villano, SerendipiTea

Monday, July 24th 2017 @ 1:21 PM

It’s HOT out there and I’ve been making cold brew iced tea with just about every type of tea in my pantry. One of my favorites, not easily found here in the States, is Mugicha (麦茶), referred to as roasted barley (mugi) tea (cha).  

This Japanese standard is delicious hot and cold! Chilled Mugicha is a refreshing, ubiquitous staple found in the fridge in many Japanese homes during the hot months of summer. Popular in Korea as well, roasted barley tea (called Boricha (보리차) there) is consumed hot more than cold. Caffeine-free, crisp and toasty with subtle sweetness, Mugicha is perfect for the kids...but you might not want to share, it's that good!


Photo Credit SerendipiTea


Steeping Instructions:

Heat water to rolling boil (212°). Using ration of 1 tablespoon of Mugicha to 1 cup boiled water, steep to personal taste. Strain then enjoy. 

Or, using same ratio add Mugicha to pot of boiled water, reduce heat then simmer for 20 minutes. Strain then enjoy.

For Cold Brew Iced Mugicha, use same ration. Add Mugicha to pitcher of water, chill in refrigerator overnight. In the morning strain then ENJOY!


IMPORTANT NOTE: Barley contains Gluten. Mugicha should be avoided by individuals on Gluten-Free diets or with Gluten-related health issues.

 

~ Linda Villano, SerendipiTea

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LINDA VILLANO co-founded SerendipiTea.com in 1995 with Tomislav Podreka. With a passion for all things Tea, she oversees all aspects of the business; including client consulting, concept and design, staff training, sourcing and product development (recipe creations). Having grown up in a family of restaurateurs and chefs, she considers her role as a purveyor of premium teas & tisanes a natural continuation of her family’s culinary tradition.   Linda is a published illustrator and writer. Her illustrations appear in Tomislav Podreka’s book, SerendipiTea: a guide to the varieties, origins and rituals of tea, and she writes articles about tea for trade publications.

Linda also writes for TeaCourse.com - check it out for more in depth knowledge on all things tea.

Direct url to this guest blog: http://linda.theteahousetimes.com

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