cassie liversidge, homegrown tea, ginger, ginger tea
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The Tea House Times Guest Blog featuring CASSIE LIVERSIDGE, Photo Credit: Mischa Haller

February 2015 Posts

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  The Tea House Times Guest Blog - Cassie Liversidge
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Top Tea to Grow this Month - Ginger by Cassie Liversidge

Monday, February 2nd 2015 @ 12:00 PM

There are many different varieties of ginger, but you need Zingiber officinale to make into tea and for other culinary use. Ginger tea can help to boost the body’s defences against cold and flu, and it may also help to relieve muscle strains after exercise and relieve arthritis. It is a very good tea to take all year around for good health. The culinary part of the plant is always referred to as the root, but it is actually the rhizome or swollen stem of the plant.


You can buy an established ginger plant in the spring and then it should be large enough to harvest by the fall. It needs to be grown at a minimum temperature of 86 ºF (30ºC) so it will have to be brought inside for the colder months, unless you live in a tropical climate.  It will die back and completely loose its leaves in the winter, but in the early spring it will grow new shoots. To care for your ginger plant when it is indoors, will require regular watering to keep the soil moist, but do not over water, especially during the colder months. It also likes it leaves sprayed with water.

 You can also plant ginger rhizomes bought from the grocer store. Choose a firm, plump rhizome with buds already formed. Fill a pot with 50 percent potting compost and 50 percent vermiculite or perlite to help give the plant good drainage. Plant the rhizome with the bud facing upwards, just below the surface of the soil.


To make a cup of fresh ginger tea put two pinches of ginger into a teabag or tea pot. Pour the boiled water (which should be between 176 to 185°F/80 to 85°C) over the tea and cover with a saucer or a lid to contain the aroma. Allow the tea to steep for three minutes, then remove the tea bag or pour the tea from the teapot using a tea strainer and enjoy. It has an amazing spicy lemony flavor.

 

Find more information on ginger, and all the other teas in my tea blog, in my book Homegrown Tea.

~Cassie Liversidge

 

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CASSIE LIVERSIDGE was born in the UK and studied fine art at Plymouth University. She grew up on her parents’ plant nursery, where her love of gardening began. Her debut book, Pasta Sauce! Grow Your Own Ingredients, came from a desire to share her passion for eating homegrown food and living in a more sustainable way. She lives and works in London with her husband and two sons, but spends time in New York each year. Cassie is author of Homegrown Tea, released March 2014. Visit her website at cassieliversidge.com

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